Tag Archives: Revolutionary art

Sometimes even an outlier becomes heard…

You cannot have a revolution without having an art to go alongside it.  Sometimes that art is living itself, sometimes it’s the expression of the angst through blood. Sometimes the tears mean more in the glimpse of 24 frames per second. Sometimes, often in actual life, there is no time for tears — and certainly no poetry that comes along with it.  There is nothing romantic about headaches nor oppression.  Yet we choose to ignore and malign our beautiful crazy visions and inner horror for the sanctity of a television news report or streamed web video of the apocalypse we’ve been led to believe in and worship.  We opt for the button-downed pathology of Wynford Marsalis as we step on Sun Ra.  We resist the spaceship for the bank teller.  While the world is as it is because we will it to be…it is also our responsibility to admit that we foolishly resist both the revolutionary visions of artists and the forlorn mad-men who have been misled and let down. “Revolutions are not fought in, of, or by poems,” as Umar from the Last Poets conceded in As an Act of Protest.  But it certainly helps to have those poems going up into the sky like fireworks…and hoping that their residue settles onto a willing recipient before the final ax falls or before the final step of the American gestalt is taken.  You can’t clap with one hand.  But you can still wield a sword.  Or a pen.

 

Design for the 2014 Chicago screening (Ben Starr)

[original design by Benn Starr, (c) 2014, originally created for the 2014 Chicago premiere]

 

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Ruby Dee 1922-2014

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A remarkable actress.

A passionate woman.

She was radical before being radical in Hollywood became hip. She knew risk in a way that would put any Hollywood ‘(H)Activist’ in 2014 to shame. This is a person who worked closely with such mavericks such as Lloyd Richards, Lorraine Hansberry and Jules Dassin. An artist who toed the line, pushed barriers, and helped interpret the soul, thoughts, and feelings of not only a generation or a race or a gender –

but an age where consciousness was not only something that the enlightened aspired to but where actors, too, were not mere hired arms

but instruments that illuminated the human condition and liberated the mental shackles impeding our evolution.

I hope your exit was joyful, Ruby.

(Say hello to Ossie for me)

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Killing The TV: The Medium is the Message…[from “As an Act of Protest”]

Destroy the Medium, destroy the message=destroy the problem.

Punk+Hip-Hop+Acting+Directing equals a new guerrilla filmmaking aesthetic.

If the Clash and Public Enemy had been filmmakers, what and how might they have expressed? The answer could be this startling clip from that short-lived movement’s crystallized example: Dennis Leroy Kangalee’s cinematic tone poem “As an Act of Protest.”

In this scene, Cairo (Che Ayende) erupts and destroys his television that has just featured the Mayor on a program where he defends police brutality & the murder of Cairo’s young brother, George. It is at this very moment that Cairo has already crossed the line and is no longer able to look back…

This visceral feature film from 2001 is a clear ‘line in the sand’ which demands the eradication of racism and, sadly, relevant and meaningful in light of the murders of Aiyana Jones and Trayvon Martin. The movie was originally conceived in 2000 as a direct response to the Mayor Giuliani-Administration’s-NYPD murder of Amadou Diallo in 1999. For obvious reasons, “As an Act of Protest” has become of one of the underrated gems of the 21st Century American independent film movement.

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